Cooking Guide for Mama Dang’s Vegan Dim Sum Meal

  

 

Lemongrass spiced Fried Vegan Won Tons
This wonton has a truly globetrotting history. They originated in China back in 1644 as a dumpling served in a noodle soup. Chinese nationals emigrating to the United States attempted to westernise their Chinese cooking, resulting in the fried won ton! Sadly, all our producers in England couldn’t grasp the concept of a vegan won ton. Our journey ended up in Vietnam, where a producer had originally started making fried won tons for the local monk community. These won tons have a lovely lemongrass flavour and we hope you enjoy them!
 
  • Preheat oven to 180°C and cook won tons for 8 minutes, turning them halfway
 
“Don’t give a Duck” Spring Rolls
 Spring rolls originated from China as a seasonal dish, eaten during the Spring Festival (no surprises). It would be packed with the new season’s spring vegetables, making it a welcome change from the preserved foods of the long winter months. We use a special “no duck” filling for our spring rolls.
  • ​Preheat oven to 180°C and cook spring rolls alongside the wontons for 8 minutes, turning them halfway.

 
Sheng Da’s Handmade Vegetable Wor Tips
 ​ "Wor Tips" translates roughly as "Pot Sticker", which is what they are more commonly known as. The name came from someone accidentally letting the water dry out when steaming the dumplings, leaving a crispy base. We were fortunate to have met Sheng Da. His team have been hand-making wor tips for a select few restaurants in London for over ten years now. We are the first people that he has made a vegan wor tip for!
 
  1. Bring a pan of water to boil, and then add the wor tips. Stir with a dash of oil (this stops them sticking together) and make sure they don’t get stuck on the base. Boil them gently for 3 minutes.
  2. Drain in a colander and shake off any excess water.
  3. Lightly grease a pan, and heat to medium. Add the dumplings, big side down. Let the base turn a nice golden brown colour (between 3-5 minutes) and they are ready to serve!

 
Chinese Mustard Greens and Bamboo Bao
The origin of the bao comes from a story in ancient Northern China. A general was retreating from the enemy, and had to cross a dangerous river to safety. The deity that guarded the river would only allow safe passage if the general through the heads of 50 of his soldiers. To trick the deity, the general made 50 buns that looked like human heads, due to their pinched nose and round shape. The deity was tricked, the soldiers safely crossed, and the Bao was born! There are many different fillings that we will be introducing to you. Our first introduction is Chinese mustard greens and bamboo shoots. Yuum! 
 
  • Steam for 10 minutes until piping hot. Make sure the filling is nice and hot when you serve
 
Mushroom & Beetroot Siu Mai
Siu Mai just might be the most famous dish in the dim sum family. This is our vegan homage, and we feel it definitely looks more attractive! The oyster mushroom and jackfruit filling give the siu mai that famous juicy texture, with beetroot giving our siu mai wrapping a lovely deep red hue.
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  1. Cut four coin sized carrot pieces. Place them in a steamer. Place each dumpling on to top of the carrot. The carrots stop the dumplings sticking to the steamer.
  2. Steam for 8 mins and serve when piping hot
 
 
 
Five Spice Jackfruit Dumpling
 A special vegan dumpling that has been specially made for us which has no meat alternative in the dim sum compendium.
 
  1. Cut four coin sized carrot pieces. Place them in a steamer. Place each dumpling on to top of the carrot. The carrots stop the dumplings sticking to the steamer
  2. Steam for 8 mins from frozen and serve

 
Black Sesame Bao
To complete your dim sum journey is a rich, creamy, nutty bao. More commonly found in dim sum restaurants in Taiwan, the sweet black sesame paste is a perfect dessert. Wash it down with some jasmine tea if it’s proving quite rich!
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  • Steam for 10 minutes until piping hot. Make sure the filling is nice and hot when you serve
 
  
Dragon Pearl Jasmine Tea
The tea buds that make this tea are hand-picked in gardens found among the chains of mountains, hidden in mist close to the Fujian border with Jiangxi in China.
This is the finest grade and is an exquisite tea from the misty mountains of Fuding, Fujian Province. Tender buds plus one to two leaves are hand plucked and then skillfully hand rolled into pearl shapes. They are then wrapped in silk mesh and carefully dried.
It also goes really well with the black sesame bao or you can drink the tea throughout your meal and keep topping up with hot water.
 
  1. Add half the sachet of pearls into a cup. Pour in boiling water and allow 4 minutes for the leaves to steep.
  2. Once the leaves have fully unfurled, it is ready to drink
  3. After the first steep, the second can be a bit shorter as the leaves have already opened up. Apply 2 minutes for your second brew.