Cooking Guide for Mama Dang’s Favourites

  

Auntie Lau's Pork Wor Tips

​ "Wor Tips" translates roughly as "Pot Sticker", which is what they are more commonly known as. The name came from someone accidentally letting the water dry out when steaming the dumplings, leaving a crispy base. When we first met auntie Lau, she scolded us for initially selling gyozas. Apparently the gyoza was adopted into Japanese culture during the Manchuria occupation in the 1930’s, and they made them smaller and with a thinner dough. “Mine are bigger and juicier!” declared Auntie Lau. She was right. They are great. And she taught us the perfect way to cook them too.

 

  1. Bring a pan of water to boil, and then add the wor tips. Stir with a dash of oil (this stops them sticking together) and make sure they don’t get stuck on the base. Boil them gently for 10 minutes.

  2. Drain in a colander and shake off any excess water.

  3. Lightly grease a pan, and heat to medium. Add the dumplings, big side down. Let the base turn a nice golden brown colour (between 3-5 minutes) and they are ready to serve!

 

Tip: cut some strips of ginger julienne style and add it to the wor tip when dipping in soy sauce.

 

Char Siu Bao

Char Siu Bao are soft, fluffy steamed buns filled with Chinese barbequed pork (which is called Char Siu).

These have been a childhood favourite and our children always fight over who has the last one!

  1. Place the bao in the steamer. The paper on the bottom of the bao prevents it from sticking.

  2. Steam for 15 minutes from frozen and serve when piping hot.

 

Siu Long Bao 

Every dim sum meal, my husband used to marvel at these. Just how on earth did the chefs manage to insert a soup into the dumplings? Was it using a syringe? Was it magic? I burst the bubble of wonderment by telling him they made a pork jelly cut into small cubes, and then wrapped the dumplings. No sorcery involved, but still a special dumpling. 

Take care when picking it up that you don't burst the skin. Place it onto a spoon and make a hole using your chopsticks to release the steam and allow the soup to cool down. Otherwise, you could burn your mouth!

 

  1. Cut four-coin sized carrot pieces. Place them in the steamer. Place each dumpling on to top of the carrot. The carrots stop the dumplings sticking to the steamer

  2. Steam for 15 minutes from frozen and serve.

 

 

Har Kau Dumplings 

Har Kau is a dim sum staple: a prawn dumpling wrapped in translucent skin with carefully folded pleats. Inside, the shrimp is commonly combined with finely chopped bamboo shoots, scallions, and a generous sprinkling of white pepper. It’s delicious in it’s simplicity but can also benefit from a dip in the soy sauce or chilli oil that we've provided. 

  1. Cut four coin sized carrot pieces. Place them in a steamer. Place each dumpling on to top of the carrot. The carrots stop the dumplings sticking to the steamer.

  2. Steam for 15 mins from frozen and serve

 

  

Uncle Chan’s Siu Mai Dumplings

Siu Mai just might be the most famous dish in the dim sum family and it is a mandatory order. Generally, the steamed dumpling is filled with a blend of pork and shrimp alongside mushrooms, ginger, scallions. Tastes great when dipped in the chilli oil.

  1. Cut four coin sized carrot pieces. Place them in a steamer. Place each dumpling on to top of the carrot. The carrots stop the dumplings sticking to the steamer

  2. Steam for 20 mins from frozen and serve

 

 

Stella’s Lo Mai Kai

These originated in the night markets of Guangzhou, China, where the earliest form of the dish was made by steaming sticky rice together with salted chicken and sausage in a small porcelain bowl. Nowadays, a lotus leaf is used to form the rice into a rectangular shape, which also imparts it’s flavour whilst steaming.

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  1. Place the parcel in a steamer. If following the menu guide, fit the four siu mais in the remaining basket space

  2. Steam for 20 minutes. The siu mai can also be steamed for the same amount of time (to make things easier)

  3. Remove the parcel and unfurl the lotus leaf. Tuck in!

 

Qin’s Nai Wong Bao 

A classic creamy custard bao to finish off your meal. A perfect dream and a childhood favourite. Our friend Qin adds coconut to the traditional recipe to make it a little bit more special!

 

  1. Place the two baos in a steamer. The paper on the bottom of the bao prevents it from sticking.

  2. Steam for 15 minutes until piping hot.

 

 

Dragon Pearl Jasmine Tea

The tea buds that make this tea are hand-picked in gardens found among the chains of mountains, hidden in mist close to the Fujian border with Jiangxi in China.

 

This is the finest grade and is an exquisite tea from the misty mountains of Fuding, Fujian Province. Tender buds plus one to two leaves are hand plucked and then skillfully hand rolled into pearl shapes. They are then wrapped in silk mesh and carefully dried.

It also goes really well with the nai wong bao, or you can drink the tea throughout your meal and keep topping up with hot water.

 

  1. Add half the sachet of pearls into a cup. Pour in boiling water and allow 4 minutes for the leaves to steep.

  2. Once the leaves have fully unfurled, it is ready to drink

  3. After the first steep, the second can be a bit shorter as the leaves have already opened up. Apply 2 minutes for your second brew.